Brazil Booed – The Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer


If we talk about the “Dark Ages” in history we tend to remember, what most call “The Middle Ages,” a time where learning and literature were somewhat stonewalled. So if we speak about the “Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer” we might be talking about the present.

This week in a terrible demonstration of Brazilian soccer (Brazil vs South Africa), the Brazilian National Squad was booed in their own country by their own fans. The world is amazed at how a team can win a game and still be booed. The reality is; the squad, the coach, the tactics, the formation, and the style are wrong. The era Dunga during the 2010 World Cup hails in comparison to Mano Menezes current squad.

“The Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer” might be around for some time to come..”

At least Dunga’s team had a “style” and had tactics on the field. This current squad doesn’t have a “style” doesn’t even have “clear” tactical presence on the field. It almost seems like Mano Menezes put them on the field and says, “Play ball boys!” Its like all-cognitive approaches to the game have been forgotten, or in words the Brazilian National Squad is “in the dark.”

Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer

The chants “Fora Mano,” or “Out Mano,” are becoming a frequent chant. Many Brazilian fans were happy to see the Olympic Squad lose to Mexico during the Olympic games. Many Brazilians believed Mano would be fired if the team lost the Olympic games. Unfortunately that did not happen and as it seems, the Brazilian Confederation is sticking with Mano for at least the Confederations Cup: a decision, which is making many Brazilians livid. A possible terrible performance can enlighten the nation for the ultimate realization of how far the “Jogo Bontio” has fallen from grace. The Confederations Cup can possibly be the pinnacle of a Renaissance era for Brazil.

We must now wait and pray for “The Brazilian Soccer Renaissance” to come as quickly as possible and wipe the “Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer” out of existence.

As it stands now “The Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer” might be around for some time to come and the “Brazilian Soccer Enlightenment” might be a future very far from our current year of 2012.

Every world cup since 1994 my friends have always said, “Brazil is not the same as before, they are no good.” “Brazil is weak and doesn’t play modern soccer like the European teams.” I on the other hand always saw Brazil as a leader and not a follower during those years from the 1990’s to the mid 2000’s. Even though friends told me, “your team sucks,” I actually knew my team really didn’t suck. Until now that is.

We must be realistic; the Brazilian National Squad is not the same as before. Long gone are the times of Ronaldo, Rivaldo, Ronaldinho, Cafu, Roberto Carlos, Kaka, Adriano (Imperador), Robinho, Lucio, Romario, Bebeto etc. etc.

I can write a whole book why this has happened, and you can read some of the history of Brazilian soccer and it’s degradation in this article, “Is FC Barcelona That Good or is Everyone That Bad.” Not to mention talent comes in waves, and the current talent on the Brazilian National squad; is how can I put this lightly, “at a low tide.” Also, as an entirety the nation of Brazil creates great soccer players with great technical skill, but for the past several generations it seems as though instead of playing a group game the Brazilian clubs give more recognition towards players who are always trying to out dribble or show off their talents in an effort to “make the team.”

Ultimately, “The Dark Ages of Brazilian Soccer” are upon us. So the booing will continue until the Renaissance begins!

 

 

 


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Roberto Avey

Roberto Avey is an ex-soccer player from Brazil. Club, Associação Atlética Ponte Preta in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 1995-1998 under coach, Francisco da Silva Júnior “Chiquinho.” He has since graduated from Midwestern State University in Texas, with a bachelor degree in journalism and helps coach teams in Southern California. Read more

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